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Today Eclipse RAP blew me away

Ok, I know the killer argument for Eclipse RAP is that using this framework one can achieve up to like 95% code reuse (yep, 95%). These days I’m developing an Eclipse RAP based application, which I tried to convert to an Eclipse RCP based one. All in all it took me 7 minutes to do so. I mean, hello, 7 minutes … that’s like no time. Transforming a full blown web application into a rich client in a glimpse of a second is just awsome.
Alright, I already hear the naysayers: “That surely wasn’t a pretty sophisticated application”. And indeed it wasn’t, BUT the steps necessary to do this transformation were pretty straight forward:

  1. Checkout the application plugins from SCM
  2. Resolve unresolved dependencies (basically remove the RAP dependencies and add those of plain Eclipse)
  3. Change the SessionSingleton to a “normal” singleton
  4. Replace the EntryPoint with a default RCP application implementation

That’s basically it. All in all this was a pretty amazing experience which let’s me almost forgett the minor hassles I had with RAP (like text boxes doing what they want when being in a higher latency network – see #242379).

XML JavaDoc doclet

My father was interested in a JavaDoc doclet which simply pumps out the available information about the classes, their methods, etc. into an XML file. So here is a 15 minutes quick&dirty hack version doing exactly that. Click here to see the code.

Just pump this little thing in your classpath and run JavaDoc with this doclet. The code is free for whatever you want to do with it. But bear in mind that it uses deprecated interfaces and has no real exception handling.

Open Smultron from your console

In case you don’t want to spend a lot of money (even though well worth) on TextMate, have a look at Smultron. And if you want to open a file using your handy command line, just alias it. Put the following line in your

.bash_profile

and your ready to go

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alias edit='open -a Smultron'

Once you got that (and have ensured that you’ve loaded the latest version of your profile), type

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edit somefile.txt

to edit a file in Smultron.

LaTeX introduction

Another day, another post. This time its an introduction to LaTeX I’ve written for a seminar I hold in school. It’s written in German, but if you happen to understand that language and want to have look at it, get it here. The zip file includes an article/reference style document, the presentation and an example file to show you what you can do with LaTeX.
The whole work is shared under a Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported licence.

LaTeX intro

LaTeX intro

WikiCircle

Alright, after looking thru my previous projects I stumbled appon some neat little script. It was one of my first experiments with graph searching and visualization. You just have to provide a topic, the script will search it on Wikipedia and try to find the most releated topics. Those topics (and their releationships) are then displayed in what I call a WikiCircle.
Ok, to be honest I mostly developed it because it looks cool and I wanted to play arround with visualization of interconnected data.

WikiCircle output

WikiCircle output

If you want to play around with it, you can download it here. It’s all published unter a Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported. Ahh, and you need ImageMagick

MimeTex ruby bindings

Did you ever wish you could render Tex code using Ruby? Now you can. Ok, it’s not entirly Ruby, but at least we got some bindings now.

I took the code from MimeTex, modified it a bit and wrote some Ruby bindings for it.
So how can I get this, you might ask?

Just install the GEM that that you can download here, using

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gem install mimetexrb-1.0.0.gem

and you’re ready to go.

Have a look at the following example on how to use it:

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require 'rubygems'
require 'mimetexrb'

renderer = MimeTex::Render.new(4)  # 4 is the font size
raw_gif = renderer.render('\sqrt{\frac{1}{2}}*\vec{a}')
File.open("output.gif", "a") { |f|
  f.print(raw_gif)
}

This code will produce \sqrt{\frac{1}{2}}*\vec{a}.
In Rails you can use send_data to send the image directly to the user.
Ahhm, just to metion this, the code that does the magic is kinda hackish. I’m really no C programmer.

Hope you enjoy this little gadget. If you have any questions feel free to contact me.

Fork me on GitHub